How do I Become an Administrative Coordinator?

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  • Written By: G. Melanson
  • Edited By: Kristen Osborne
  • Last Modified Date: 25 May 2017
  • Copyright Protected:
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An administrative coordinator in today’s working world needs to function as a jack-of-all-trades within a company or organization. The broad skill-set required of administrative coordinators often makes for a job description that includes the traditional responsibilities of secretarial staff plus more. In addition to administrative support tasks such as answering phones, filing, and overseeing office supplies, a person who wishes to become an administrative coordinator also needs to have a grasp of how the organization operates as a whole. While some of the skills required to become an administrative coordinator can be acquired through related professional experience, others may require educational training.

As administrative coordinator positions are usually classified as entry-level, an intern or temporary staff member could become an administrative coordinator by being promoted. Employers are very often prone to hiring internally versus recruiting for additional personnel when a position opens up within the organization. One reason for hiring administrative staff internally is that they already have a firm grasp of how the organization operates, and a general overview of the coordination process between such departments as sales, marketing, accounting, and IT. A person who wishes to become an administrative coordinator but is not already employed with the company is more likely to be considered if he or she has an academic background in business. Most business programs, whether at the certificate or diploma level, give a comprehensive overview of how different business processes work and the role that administrative coordination plays.

The ability to communicate clearly is perhaps the most crucial skill required of someone who endeavors to become an administrative coordinator. All administrative positions require the ability to communicate via phone, email, fax, and interpersonally. The style of communication is also crucial, and requires the ability to communicate clearly, politely, and professionally at the same time. Balancing these qualities can be a skill in itself. For example, efficiency is an important quality in effective communication; however, communicating too efficiently can verge on rude or abrupt, just as communication that is too friendly and informal can seem unprofessional.

A typing course would benefit those pursuing any type of administrative position, especially someone who wants to become an administrative coordinator. Typing courses are offered at most high schools as part of the general curriculum, as well as at community colleges. Typing classes are also occasionally offered for free as part of government programs dedicated to helping people find employment.

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